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Barton Village


Jo Med
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Great article and great pictures! Thanks, Jo.

Does anyone know what is meant by sugar dolls? She says she learned to make them in a class and her obsession took off from there.

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Fascinating, Jo! Hey, Kathie, she's only a year or so older than us!

...Does anyone know what is meant by sugar dolls? She says she learned to make them in a class and her obsession took off from there.

I Googled sugar people and came up with this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar_people

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Fascinating, Jo! Hey, Kathie, she's only a year or so older than us!

Uh huh ... and she's retiring from minis while we're still going gung ho -- or at least you will be when the workshop is finished. :D I have a feeling we'll go down with a glue syringe in one hand and a utility knife in the other!

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Retirement isn't for sissies - just so you know - you younger folks. We are retirement age but still have to run our own business to support raising grandkids. Life can throw you unexpected curves. Don't count on lots of free time with nothing to do. Our blessings keep us quite busy in spite of our age and infirmities.

I had seen that article a bit ago and thought, if it was me, and no one else lived in my house except my DH, I think I take over another room or the garage and keep building !!!!

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Selkie, I understand your situation and commend you for what you and your husband are doing. I feel blessed that we don't have to work in our golden years.

When I was much younger, I thought retirement was wasted on old people. Now that I am one, I understand that only with a broad life experience can one even begin to appreciate the possibilities retirement offers. So much to do ... so little time (relatively speaking)!

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  • 4 weeks later...

Great article and great pictures! Thanks, Jo.

Does anyone know what is meant by sugar dolls? She says she learned to make them in a class and her obsession took off from there.

I found this:

sugar doll

A female that does not fit the typical status quo when it comes to models and/or beauty. She is healthy, curvy, and revels in that fact that she is original.

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I found this:

sugar doll

A female that does not fit the typical status quo when it comes to models and/or beauty. She is healthy, curvy, and revels in that fact that she is original.

Dang, Mike ... that's ME! :rofl:

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I love her village! I've been doing a lot of thinking about the big house we hope to move into next summer. It has a FULL attic with no rafters to chop your head off, and fully floored. I got to thinking about a mini village up there ...

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Great article and great pictures! Thanks, Jo.

Does anyone know what is meant by sugar dolls? She says she learned to make them in a class and her obsession took off from there.

I googled sugar dolls and the only thing I came up with was making them for cakes. I am sure that is not what hers are made from.... I'd think the bugs would have a feast.

Kellee

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Coincidentally, as many will already know, there is a brand of vintage doll's houses and furniture called Barton. I scanned these houses eagerly because I thought I might recognise one or two. No joy - the family name is Barton - the houses are not LOL. I do recognise one house as Jubilee Terrace - I have the shop that matches it. I've bought a lot of Barton furniture in recent months because I love 1/16th (3/4?) scale. I love 1/12th scale too (1"?) but the houses tend to be very large and heavy. Already I am running out of space.

The Triang houses I hope to modify are both 1/16th scale, as are Lundby houses - very popular in the UK. Sylvanian Families (Calico Critters, I believe!) houses and furniture are also roughly 1/6th scale but chairs, beds etc have been widened to accommodate wide cutesy animal bodies!

A lot of the 1/16th scale Barton furniture resembles, or can be modified to approximate, 1930s stuff. Much harder to source are 1/16th scale dolls. I have tracked-down a few, male and female, all cute and tiny and dressed in Victorian clothes (for now). 1/16th scale dolls are also very costly, as is new 1/16th furniture.

Since 3/4 scale doesn't seem to be mentioned on the forum, it may not be of interest to US and Canadian members.

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1:16 was an early popular scale; it was the scale of my Keystone dollhouse (from the early 1940s) and the Tootsietoy and Renwal furniture I furnished it with. I think a lot of the reason 1:12 has grown so much in popularity these days is that so mini of us who enjoy building can more easily convert from feet to inches.

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