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I want to add a scullery to my queen anne


asherah
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As it would have had in real life. But where do I put it? I was giong to do from left to right, Kitchen with dining room behind it, hallway, living room. What do you think? It bugs me that there isn't another room for a scullery.

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Funny, I just came from RGT's website. Got an email from them this morning that all orders over $100 are 20% off. Enter code FALL2021 at check-out. Anyway, when you say from left to right, I assume that's looking at the rear of the house so I went with that.

You have to worry about the hinged dining room wall and make sure you don't obstruct that. That means not just putting something in front of it (I know you'd hardly do that!), but also leaving enough room for it to swing open. I don't know how long that side wall is between the rear of the house and the dining room bump-out, but most additions may be too deep. You'll have to let the add-on stick out beyond the rear of your house. I've done it (and currently doing it again on one of my houses!), and IMO it just adds interest. I like it!

Whatever you do, do not attach it to the house. Obviously fill in the gap between the foundation boards, make it match, but let it just sit next to the house. The QA is already huge and you are going to have one heck of a time moving it if you attach an extension to one side. You can also use fake doors (love those!) so you wouldn't even have to cut door openings, not that that's difficult.

You need something substantial enough to balance out the size of that house. Personally, I would go with this one, but first check measurements to make sure it doesn't extend above your eave line:

https://www.realgoodtoys.com/collections/1-inch-scale-design-families-dollhouse-additions/products/new-haven-2-story-dollhouse-addition-kit

That angled front works to echo the big tower on the other side, plus the bay of the dining room that will be right in front of it. The two-story height makes it look like it belongs, which you may not get if you stick a stubby little 1-story addition on the side. And you get the added bonus of a sitting room or nice big bathroom off the bedroom (I assume it's a bedroom?) above the kitchen.

Remember you can order it with windows to match the rest of the house. Just tell jennifer@realgoodtoys.com you want to swap out for those. There will likely be an upgrade charge but it should be cheaper than buying them outright.

I didn't swap out all the windows, obv., but it would look like this:

Modified RGT QA.jpg

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Not to belabour a point (too late, Kells) but I simply had to fix that shabby edit. I fixed the windows, carried over the trim, and added a little side door, which I love there. This one is a bit less "use your imagination." Sorry, I am just major OCD that way, haha.

Modified RGT QA.jpg

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Kells, that’s a great addition, especially as “edited” with the separate kitchen door. Someone whose blog I follow is renovating a REAL Queen Anne, and he commented that it wasn’t easy to get from the front of the house to the kitchen, but to remain true to the period, he didn’t want to do many alterations to fix that. When the house was built, the lady of the house likely never set foot in the kitchen! Any staff she needed to speak to came to HER. So naturally, someone delivering ice or groceries would have used another entrance. (Shades of “Upstairs, Downstairs,” eh?)

In a lot of English houses, the kitchen, scullery, pantry, and servants’ quarters would have been located on a basement level. I believe this was also the case in the brownstones of Manhattan, based on ones I have visited. 

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3 hours ago, peonyfoxburr said:

Kells, that’s a great addition, especially as “edited” with the separate kitchen door. Someone whose blog I follow is renovating a REAL Queen Anne, and he commented that it wasn’t easy to get from the front of the house to the kitchen, but to remain true to the period, he didn’t want to do many alterations to fix that. When the house was built, the lady of the house likely never set foot in the kitchen! Any staff she needed to speak to came to HER. So naturally, someone delivering ice or groceries would have used another entrance. (Shades of “Upstairs, Downstairs,” eh?)

In a lot of English houses, the kitchen, scullery, pantry, and servants’ quarters would have been located on a basement level. I believe this was also the case in the brownstones of Manhattan, based on ones I have visited. 

Thank you! TBH it makes me want that house now so I can put that addition on myself! Not that I have a place for it.

Funny, I recently mentioned Upstairs-Downstairs. I see I forgot to mention that I'm putting a door into the kitchen side of my house for exactly the reasons you mentioned. There's a window across from the basement staircase (link below) that will be easily cut out for a side door into the kitchen. I grew up in an old house that had a service entrance and even a servant's staircase. Not that we had servants! The servant would have been me. ("Kells! Wash the dishes already!" "Yeessss, Mommmmm....") But that thing sure made it convenient to slip out the back kitchen door to get up to no good, haha.

https://forum.greenleafdollhouses.com/gallery/image/142190-left-side-labeledjpg/

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