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Beacon Hill


Halie
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First time doll house builder and I decided to get the beacon hill (probably more intense than I should start with for my first dollhouse but here goes nothing). Silly question but I’m starting to slide the walls into the floors and wondering where I should be placing the glue (I am using hot glue). Should I put it directly on the edge of the wood? It’s such a snug fit it takes me a few minutes to get the pieces together. Or should I do a dry fit and then try to squeeze the glue in the opening while it’s already assembled?   

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Do NOT, I repeat, NOT use hot glue!  Yes, do the dry fit and make any adjustments to the tabs & slots to get a more perfect fit, and then use a good carpenters' wood glue (like Titebond), which you can apply with a pointed toothpick.  There are NO silly or dumb questions if you don't know the answer.  Several of our members have built the Beacon Hill and blogged about it.

 

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Thank you!! The instructions specifically said to use hot glue so that’s why I was doing that. I have three other kinds of wood glue / tacky glue and plenty of toothpicks so I can easily do that. I’m just curious, why not use hot glue?  

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25 minutes ago, Halie said:

why not use hot glue?

Unlike the hot glue sticks that were in use when the instructions were written, the current iterations of hot glue will dry out over time. It will pull away from the surface and the house will come tumbling down. Not to mention it globs and strings and generally does not make the nice clean seams that we love.

I usually run a bead of wood glue along the edge of the piece and on the tabs, push it into place, and clamp with clamps or painter's tape. Run a damp finger along the seam to clean up where any glue squeezes out. After the joint has dried, I often run a bead of tacky glue along it. Capillary action pulls the glue into any open crevices and makes a nice smooth joint. This is especially useful on vertical wall joins that are to be painted; makes a nice, smooth surface for the paint.

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  • 2 months later...
On 12/28/2020 at 8:21 AM, KathieB said:

Capillary action pulls the glue into any open crevices and makes a nice smooth joint. This is especially useful on vertical wall joins that are to be painted; makes a nice, smooth surface for the paint.

OMG!!! I didn't know this! Love the idea! Thank you! 

Kim 

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