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Ok, I’ve been perusing the forum and the blogs, and in a way I feel like I’ve almost gotten too much information! Lots to process. I’ve labeled and dry-fitted the main bits of my Orchid, and I know what I want to do with about 3/4 of it. However, the exterior is a puzzle. I want to achieve the effect of smooth, newly-applied plaster on the outside of my house, and I’d love to know what material more experienced people prefer to use, and what sort of prep would be best. Thanks!

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Hi Joanne,

I probably would get the smoothest results using paper clay. https://www.paperclay.com/

Rik Pierce has many examples and techniques on his web site. https://www.frogmorton.com/ 

 The clay rolls out like a refrigerated sugar cookie dough, only less sticky.  There really isn't too much prepwork. You apply glue to the surface, then apply the thin sheets of clay. Any seams can be smoothed together.

Edited by Mid-life madness
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I grew up in a stucco house, so that's my preferred look for my little houses:

farmhouse front yard.JPG

My personal weapon of choice is spackling compound, although lately I have been using joint compound.  The Lily I'm working on now wants to become a Tuscan Villa and wants it's plastered exterior to be old & weathered and missing in places to show the sandpaper "bricks", as I did with the Lighthouse:

finished side

 

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People have posted good suggestions. Another option is watered down wood filler, applied with a sponge brush. You can keep adding water to the wood filler until it's the consistency you want -- less water will create more texture, and more water will give you a smoother finish.

texture22.jpg

If you want more of a stucco look, tap the wet wood filler with the sponge brush to create a bumpy texture.

gatorboard11.jpg

 

 

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I used matte gel medium mixed with paint on the inside and exterior of Tudor Cottage to simulate plaster and stucco. I built it up a little to add texture, but it also sands down nicely when it’s dry. It an easy way to get a nice effect.

 

 

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Fantastic ideas one and all! Thanks!
I will be doing a lot of experimenting in the next few weeks. The Squirrel House (the eBay fixer-upper I’m also working on) is wavering between becoming a Tudor Townhouse or a North Oxford Gothic, so I should be pretty proficient at this when I’m done. :)

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