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Clay stone technique


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I am thinking of making a rock wall foundation for my Pierce. Maybe even the chimney. I am worried there will be too much brick and the stencil doesn't fit under the floor overhang.  So I found this video about DIY rock wall roller from Real Terrain Hobbies. It's pretty cool. But I think his example is of 1/2 scale? Could someone watch the video (if you haven't already seen it, lol) and let me know? If it is, then I think I can make one using stones twice as big. Thank you very much. I've looked at a lot of stuff about scale, but I don't think I am a good judge yet.

https://youtu.be/8vCSxgsgATI

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1 hour ago, Medieval said:

I think his example is of 1/2 scale? Could someone watch the video (if you haven't already seen it, lol) and let me know? If it is, then I think I can make one using stones twice as big.

Hey, Jess. Thanks for posting this. It is a great technique. It does not really matter what scale he is demonstrating. Use stones of a size that looks right to you and you will be good to go. :) 

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9 hours ago, KathieB said:

Hey, Jess. Thanks for posting this. It is a great technique. It does not really matter what scale he is demonstrating. Use stones of a size that looks right to you and you will be good to go. :) 

I need to find a pile of gravel then....thanks KathieB!

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How much will real gravel weigh down your house?  I like carving "stones" into damp spackling compound and then coloring them when the spackle's dry, like I did on my McKinley's tower; it weighs next to nothing.

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Holly, the gravel is only used to impress the rock shapes into an air dry clay sheet.  The tutorial shows how to make your own mold with this, and then use it on more air dry clay to create stone walls.  As you know, the air dry clay is lightweight.

The tutorial shows different air dry clays ... I personally like paperclay.  I find that it's very smooth and easy to work with.  I don't care for the smell of Das clay, but some people enjoy it.

Another fun way to make stones is using cardboard egg carton/drinks trays.  There are several tut links posted in threads here, I'm sure you could do a search and find all the great tips if you're interested in trying it.

 

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That's what I get for not opening the link!  (We were in a motel in Birmingham, AL, with extremely slow wifi.)  I have also used styrofoam egg carton to simulate river rocks.

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3 hours ago, Medieval said:

I am using paper clay. I found a video that shows how to make it at home. I'm gonna give that a whirl. Certainly less expensive!

The one with junk mail in the food processor? I've been wanting to try making some, I like the texture. 

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3 hours ago, Medieval said:

Oh, and it helps to coat the measuring cups for joint compound and glue in mineral oil first.

Lol I bet it does but I wouldn't have thought about doing that so thanks! I went by HL today but didn't get any clay so who knows I may just try this yet.

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Thank you.  I didn't intend to hijack the thread.  I've talked with the art staff and tech (CAD) people at the school I work at.  No one has done or even heard of paper clay.  I was hoping to get tips.  If I can get it to be less sticky and more clay like I will be happy!  Almost there with second batch.  I'm beginning to suspect it is the blending I am lacking.  I didn't want to use my stand mixer and probably need to spend more time with kneading.

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Keep at it, Jess - you'll get there!  (And we'll all be interested to hear of, and to see your results!)  :)

The paperclay sold by craft stores like Michaels is made with volcanic ash.  I think the texture is beautifully smooth.  The product is expensive, but I just love it.

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Jess, haunt all of your local thrift stores for used mixers or processors you can dedicate to mixing your clay.  You'll get a more uniform product and you can work the stickiness out with your hands.

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Will do! Maybe for bowls and measuring tools too.  I was squeamish using my cooking stuff. I made sure to wash in really hot water. Thanks Holly! Didn't think of that.

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1 hour ago, havanaholly said:

I bought an el cheapo toaster oven & oven thermometer I use only for baking polymer clay.

Me, too. And the pasta machine that once made lovely linguine now only flattens polyclay. 

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3 minutes ago, KathieB said:

Me, too. And the pasta machine that once made lovely linguine now only flattens polyclay. 

Priorities! Who needs to eat when you can make minis?

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Just now, Medieval said:

Oh! Not a good idea to use oven?

Polycly can put out fumes during baking that may adhere to the oven itself. Better to be safe than sorry.

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