Jump to content

1:12 quilt with foil for batting?


Bluestocking
 Share

Recommended Posts

I heard a tip yesterday to use foil as batting for a miniature quilt, which will help it drape more realistically.  I have no doubt that this works, but I'm wondering if anyone who has one has noticed any downside?  I wondered about the edges of the foil cutting into the fabric, but maybe the quilt doesn't get enough wear for this to be an issue?  Does the quilt stay creased in the "wrong" place if you change the placement, or can you smooth it out?

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You wouldn't need the piece of foil to go all the way to the edge seams; you can slide it into place once the quilt is turned right side out, before closing that last edge.  I'm not sure why you would want to change the placement once it's on the bed or sofa or wherever it's going to drape, but if you close that last edge with a basting stitch it would be easy enough to open that edge and put a fresh piece of foil inside, if necessary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have tried this.  I've taken it to about a cm off the edges (sorry wouldn't have a clue what that is in imperial) so you don't see it - but it's not 'inside' the bed cover, just on the underside.  It works really well and is easy to crinkle and crease as well as smooth out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One advantage of putting the foil between the cover and the backing is that it could be folded back on itself in a casual setting. Also, if the item is actually machine quilted, I should think exposed foil would tend to tear away, as in paper piecing. Since foil itself has the ability to crease or crumple and then smooth out, it seems likely that it would do the same when bonded with cloth, maybe even more so. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To machine quilt with stitches small enough to be in scale would shred the foil if it were inside the quilt; I was thinking of the quilts my grandmother made, which she used an old blanket for the batt and just used her darning needle to thread wool at the block corners to tie the layers together.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, havanaholly said:

To machine quilt with stitches small enough to be in scale would shred the foil if it were inside the quilt; I was thinking of the quilts my grandmother made, which she used an old blanket for the batt and just used her darning needle to thread wool at the block corners to tie the layers together.

But if it is layered inside the quilt, it would not move, eh? [Note to self: gotta try this. Quilts would look good on Bohemian inn beds.]

I like idea of a tied quilt. We had one when I was  a kid that an aunt made out of her late husband's suits. She tied it with yarn. That sucker was HEAVY. There was no squirming around when it was on the bed, and you better believe it was warm. :D 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've used foil several times. I just cut it to size of edge seam to edge seam, then slide it into the quilt or coverlet and stitch closed at the open end. The foil stays in place perfectly and the overlet can be adjusted  and readjusted to lay as you wish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, havanaholly said:

To machine quilt with stitches small enough to be in scale would shred the foil if it were inside the quilt; I was thinking of the quilts my grandmother made, which she used an old blanket for the batt and just used her darning needle to thread wool at the block corners to tie the layers together.

I didn't actually quilt the only one I've made so far -- I thought it would make the quilt too stiff. 

2837.jpg.fe76504190f2bd8db4654aafb6cf29b

I ended up just steaming it a lot to get it to hang straight!

I wondered if I wanted to change one quilt for another, or rearrange maybe (turn it down or scrunch it to look "lived in" -- or of course, tidy it up!), how would the foil behave?

I will try the foil -- it sounds like a great trick!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, havanaholly said:

I would think putting the foil on the underside would work better, anyway.  Did you sew it or use a flexible glue?

yes, used a glue....I'm just seeing if I have a photo....nope.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I've tried that method using aluminum foil. It works really nicely, and can be folded and refolded several times without any issues. I machine basted the foil to a "lining" piece, with the foil cut about 1/4" smaller on all sides. Then I pinned and sewed the "foiled" lining inside the front and back of the quilt cover. The machine needle didn't seem to have an issue going through the aluminum foil. It may have even sharpened the needle a little, as I've heard you can sharpen a paper cutter blade by cutting alum foil.

I've also tried the method of sewing thin wire inside the perimeter of a miniature quilt to assist with natural draping. Both methods are a little labor intensive, but well worth it. If I had to choose, I'd say the wire inside the edge works better for multiple uses, and performs just as well as foil inside the entire quilt for draping.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Thumbwick said:

I've also tried the method of sewing thin wire inside the perimeter of a miniature quilt to assist with natural draping. Both methods are a little labor intensive, but well worth it. If I had to choose, I'd say the wire inside the edge works better for multiple uses, and performs just as well as foil inside the entire quilt for draping.

I wonder if I could try wire in the hem of a curtain to help with draping? (Along with steaming the folds in) Have you made curtains?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, Lita said:

I wonder if I could try wire in the hem of a curtain to help with draping? (Along with steaming the folds in) Have you made curtains?

If you shape the curtains by sticking them down to a piece of foam core or corrugated cardboard with straight pins so they form a satisfactory drape, then spray with hair spray, they will hold their shape. The hair spray holds well and is not visible when dry.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...