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I haven't priced lead tape recently, but that looks like a very large roll. Also look in golf pro shops for lead tape in smaller amounts for (I'm pretty sure) less cost and have a sticky backing.

Also, clear nail polish will make the same wavy surface on the glass, again at a much lower cost.

Keep in mind that in the real leaded windows of the type in the video, the leading would have been about a half inch wide. Practice cutting until you can get nice, clean strips of a reasonable -- and consistent-- size for the most realistic look.

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I'm in the middle of attempting this too.  I'm not sure how realistic mine is looking but the method is pretty straight forward.

I first saw it here on Casey's blog http://caseymini.blogspot.co.uk/2011/06/let-me-out-of-here.html but it seems to be a common method.

The nail varnish really makes a difference and you can use sharpies for added stain glass effects (bear in mind the varnish will dissolve the pen though!)

The trickiest part I have found is stopping the lead curling up when you cut it so thin but I'm getting better!

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And from experience, fingernail polish while says clear, different clear polishes are different clears.  I discovered some are more yellow. I now buy mine in one batch, cause I want my glass the same clear!

i didn't like the yellow, so I check my bottles for a slightly purple tinge, and so far, good

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Colored nail polish makes good stained glass windows as well.

On the last dollhouse I built, I used purple nail polish (to match the theme of the house) in the center pattern of the windows and clear polish. I only used the clear on the door window as it 'frosted' the 'glass'. I will be investing in a different clear polish if I plan to do stained glass again (I was aiming for the ripply effect stated above). The little girl and her parents loved the house and thought the windows were great.

I did learn that the brush in the nail polish is not the best for applying the polish to the finer areas of stained glass patterns and a fine paint brush works better.

I tried to include a picture to show what I am talking about, but it won't let me. So, I hope I have worded this clearly.

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Gallery Glass (sold in the stained glass/faux stained glass supplies) in Clear works better in my experience and is easier to use than clear nail polish for simulating old wavy glass. Just have to be careful not to get bubbles..move it around with a toothpick slowly, not a brush. I use the colored gallery glass for a few stained glass panes here and there. 

Forgot to say...that method (the link you posted) is what I use as well, works great and kinda fun :) 

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I took an easier way, using dollhouse clear tile sheets that I had bought years ago from Miniatures.com. Waste not, want not. Here's the description of how I used it. The window was in the 19th century wash house. Since my wash house is a room box, and has front glass panel, I didn't see any need to add texture to the window glass, but you could add the nail polish layer.

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Gallery glass. Cool, I will have to try that!

I have not used lead tape. I used the pattern already printed on the 'window'. I would have used thread or embroidery thread (I believe someone on here suggested that method at some point - I just can't remember who) if there had not been a pattern already there. Someday, I will use their suggestion as I have lots of threads available and no lead tape.

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I used the lead tape from my husbands golf store, I had to trim it down.  I used a pattern under my "glass". I just taped it to it, and ran my lead tape.  It was super easy! I flipped it over for the other side, and then I used finger nail polish, on both sides.

 I used gallery glass in colors, too, for another project.

I really like the way it looks, and it was super easy, exc pt for the trimming down of the tap, that was kind of tricky.

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I took Barbra Sabia's (the queen of miniature stain glass) workshop one year at the Denver miniature show.   I never intended to actually do my own stain glass as I could never do it as well as someone that has been doing it for 30 years.  I really just wanted to see how she does it.  I have several of her doors and windows and I will continue to buy pieces from her instead of stressing myself trying to accomplish this art form to my satisfaction  .   She attaches the pattern  to a light box and then traces the pattern onto the piece of acrylic using the lead tape.  She has her students spend a great deal of time practicing cutting the lead tape into the appropriate size - I think this is probably the hardest thing to do.  She uses Gallery Glass and different brushes and strokes to achieve different effects such as wavy glass, frosted glass etc.  Miniature Designs sells the lead tape on their website for $8.99 per yard.

http://miniaturedesigns.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=4_76_275&products_id=34679

P.S.  Just be very careful using the lead tape wash your hands immediately after handling it.  Barbara said in class that she rountinely has certain medical tests to make sure she is not having any negative affects from using it.

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I tried getting fancy and doing a curved elaborate design with the lead tape. Beyond frustrating. People that can do that well certainly earn their money. I'll stick with the basic diamond pattern :) 

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Yes, I've used the golf lead tape. It is easy and quicker than I thought it would be. I smoothed it onto the glass using a plastic clay tool (has a flat blade type shape). 

Another way I've done leaded windows was to print a design onto clear heat resistent transparency/acetate then as soon as it came out of the printer, I sprinkled embossing powder onto the design. I then heated it over the toaster. You do need to be sure to clean up the specks of powder over the acetate though or you get lots of embossed dots (which could be great for some things I suppose).

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I've used bubble paint to create lead lines and GalleryGlass for the color and opaque sections in the past. The one drawback is the bubble paint requires a really steady hand to get consistent line thickness.

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So you all put the fear in me dealing with lead tape.

i ran to Hobby Lobby to see what they had. They had these two options so I purchased both.

the Gallery Glass Simulated Liquid Leading (@Dalesq as you mentioned above). Haven't experimented with it yet. It cost $10.99 for 2 FL oz. kind of pricey.

i also purchased Stained Glass Foiling Tape from Studio Pro. It's 36 yards, pretty thin and cost $6.99. The only thing is this tape is copper color. I've included a photo of my experiment. Unfortunately the photo isn't great but working and cutting the tape is easy. I just don't know if I can do the copper color. 

Still looking for all options.

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

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Don't let the lead tape warnings put you off. As long as you wash your hands well after working with it, you should have no problems. I owned and operated a stained glass shop for several years and insisted on frequent hand washings, no food on or near the work tables, reminders not to put hands to mouth ... common sense stuff ... and neither I nor my employees ever had a problem. 

You've already discovered the problem with the copper tape -- its color. I suppose you could run a bead of solder over it, but then you'd have the challenge of cleaning the excess flux off of the glass. 

My issue with the Gallery Glass liquid lead is that it must be applied with a brush or toothpick or whatever seems to work for the user, but is it dratted difficult to keep the width of the line consistent, no matter how steady a hand wields the applicator, so it looks faked.

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Ok, not liking the liquid lead at all. Way to hard to control. But I have to say I love this tape, but I need an honest opinion. Do you think the copper color looks OK? I had to do two coats of clear nail polish to get the effect I wanted but cutting and laying down the tape was a breeze. 

So, is the copper color nah or yeah?

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

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