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Question: Syle or era of this 1/4 scale furniture set


Jane S

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Hey folks,

I have purchased this set of 1/4 scale furniture and I am not exactly sure of the setting for it.

Can some one place me in the era/ style of this set? I thought it might be a Victorian' ish style but it looks plain maybe more of a country style?

I want to get my first small scale house but I also want to utilize these pieces...so please direct me :blush:

Thanks much!

5261481_lg.jpg

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A setting from 1895 to 1910 is a pretty safe bet. If you want to do a country farmhouse, you can go into the 1920's or even early 30's.

Before 1890 the bathrooms tended to be more wood, less porcelain. You start seeing bathrooms like that a lot more often beginning around 1910, but they were available before that.

The bedroom dresser is Eastlake style, popular from about 1870 to 1890.

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A setting from 1895 to 1910 is a pretty safe bet. If you want to do a country farmhouse, you can go into the 1920's or even early 30's.

Before 1890 the bathrooms tended to be more wood, less porcelain. You start seeing bathrooms like that a lot more often beginning around 1910, but they were available before that.

The bedroom dresser is Eastlake style, popular from about 1870 to 1890.

Thank you very much!

Now on to the research!............................. :plane:

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Eastlake describes it well; or aka Edwardian. Late 1870s is when the major influx of mass-produced furniture arrived. Jigsaws and scroll saws along with better lathes hit the manufacturing scene enabling fast and easy replication of all that gingerbread trim and scalloped edges on furniture, making it affordable for middle-class customers.

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The pieces pictured were the first 1/4 scale furniture I saw much of. That was over 20 years ago. Spray primer and paint and you can do all kinds of adorable things with it.

These pieces have been around for 20 years? Think they would have made another set by now *lol* . They are really quite nice, I was concerned with the styrene but they do not have obvious lines and are formed quite nicely.

Eastlake describes it well; or aka Edwardian. Late 1870s is when the major influx of mass-produced furniture arrived. Jigsaws and scroll saws along with better lathes hit the manufacturing scene enabling fast and easy replication of all that gingerbread trim and scalloped edges on furniture, making it affordable for middle-class customers.

Thanks hon, I was looking for a few Eastlake style 1/4 scale homes today, I figure I can always minibash a simple home a bit, with the a tower piece..even thick cardstock at this scale.

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I say if you even went with a newer style house you could paint and change these pieces up a bit.... making them fit in a more modern house.... Petite Properties has some really cool houses too, by the way, I have built several... there are a few I think would look nice with this furniture :) .... or go with painting them soft yellows and blues and go with a French Country feel.... this little house would look cute with these pieces

http://petitepropertiesltd.com/onlineshop/index.php?_a=product&product_id=6

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Actually, the furniture in question has been around longer than that! I bought my first cards when I was working in a mini shop almost 30 years ago. Back then, some of the pieces, like the kitchen stove, was black plastic and the whole set was more detailed. The latest ones that I bought from HBS were a bit disappointing. They are still cute, but need more cleaning up and painting than the earlier pieces.

The chair seats are now narrower in the front than inthe back. They don't even make sense! The opposite of what a chair is shaped like. I still use them, but they are a lot more work than they used to be.

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