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What have You used Spackle For Other than the Usual Purpose?


Roxxie2
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This topic was inspired by Lene's post this morning about her spackling success. So, I thought I would query folks and find out what they have used it for other than filling holes.
I have used it to "frost" mini cakes and to simulate SNOW on the roof. What have you found spackle useful for? :)

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As I posted on Lene's thread in reply to your query there, I've used it for morter, plaster, stucco, tabby & stonework. Following Sherise's tip about piping drywall mud, I have thought about piping spackle for architectural features; but it's probably too lightweight and the mud might be better... BTW, is drywall mud different from joint compound? Oh, and I've used it for frosting, pargets. I believe Ken made a template out of the plastic needlepoint scrim and used spackle to make brickwork.

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I'm not sure which of these products she uses but WyckedWood pipes a lot of exterior décor on her houses with one of the types. Her work is so wonderful. Off topic: Hm-m-m-m?? Speaking of ... I wonder if she is settled in to her new place yet?

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. ... Off topic: Hm-m-m-m?? Speaking of WyckedWood.. I wonder if she is settled in to her new place yet?

I've been wondering and missing her too! :)

I can't think of anything I've used spackle for except filling gaps and holes.

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Slightly off the topic here - can I please ask is someone able to describe the texture of spackle? I am struggling to find an equivalent - it turns out Polyfilla is a brand so there a lots of different ones and no multi purpose one like I was hoping... I found a selley's product called Spakfilla rapid set which is really easy to work with but doesn't seem to stick well on the edges etc unless it's quite thick - it's kind of like the texture of a butter cream frosting and white - am I on the right track with the product - is it maybe my technique (or lack thereof) that needs work?

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Helen, there are various 'weights' of spackle. I tend to use lightweight around the real and mini house. I'd say buttercream frosting fits for some of the heavier spackles, a good lightweight equivalent escapes me right now. There are times when I've had to slather it on heavily and then sand it down or do two coats - sanding in between- to get good coverage for big holes or gaps.

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Yes,the buttercream frosting and whipped cream comparisons to the different weights are what I'd use,too. And don't get discouraged,Helen. I had never seen or touched spackle in my life before I bought some for minis. It took me awhile,practicing on scraps to get a feel for it-not days or anything now,but someone who has never seen it before may take longer to adjust to the feel of it. I've used all kinds now,including the Dep pink. My favorite is the lightweight. You'll love it all,though,when you get used to using it!! I will always have a tub or 2 handy!! :ohyeah:

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Having just found in my husbands stash a polfilla for large cracks my spakfilla seems lighter - maybe more the whipped cream Kat referenced? so I think it might just be my technique that's the issue ... off to swallow my pride and ask hubby for advice.

Sorry to keep using the food references Holly ;) I just couldn't work out how else to describe it think I've spent far too many years baking ... lol

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Love spackle for filling holes, I also use it for grout in half-scale tile, full scale I just use real grout.

Off topic, I used to use a makeup concealer that was called spackle. It came in three grades lightweight, moderate and heavy-duty :rofl:

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At one time, I made some Uncle Sam figures out of pieces of fence post and painted the outfits on--used spackle for the hair and beards. Weather-resistant and still in place 22 years later. Also have used it for merangue on mini-food pies, and biscuits, loaves of bread, candles, tiny bagpipes, etc. Snow on roofs and eaves. Of course, it started out by fixing holes and cracked walls in all my "This Old House" projects.

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So what is the difference between spackle, wood putty and caulk?

Great question! In general:

  • Spackle is white, water soluble, spreads easily, can be tinted with acrylic paints or ink and dries to a matte, plaster-like finish.
  • Wood putty is tan/wood colored, much stiffer in consistency, and also dries hard with a matte finish. Can be sanded, painted..
  • Caulk comes in a tube, white or in colors, depending on its intended use. It is usually applied with a nozzle, from a tube or a caulking gun. Most caulks are a silicone product, not water soluble. Some of it is paintable and some is not. It sets to a smooth, glossy, rubbery finish. (I like it for frosting mini cakes. It's fun to raise peaks by touching the surface with a toothpick.)
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Oh my word,Brae-that is amazing! You are so talented!!

I need advice concerning something I want to use spackle for. How would you/anyone suggest texturing the walls to look like what we in my area call 'sheetrock'? I think I want to use spackle in my new build,but don't want to make the heavy stucco texture walls-which I am using on the pizza place I set aside for now. Since I grew up with stucco exteriors in California,and there's a lot of tuts,the rough texture was easy to emulate. Sheetrock is usually pretty smooth,but I don't want to just paint the kit's wood walls-I don't want wood grain showing through painted dh walls,as it ruins the illusion for me...I was thinking I'd coat the wall with a smooth layer of spackle,maybe sand it,and then paint over it. I'm not sure I've ever seen plastered walls in person-would that be the same texture as sheet rock,or is it thicker and more textured? Help?

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Thank you!!! :flowers:

I believe sheet rock is the same thing as drywall. To get a smooth solid color wall, I've done two things. The easier of the two is to use cardstock or drawing paper, applied to the wall as you would any wallpaper after the wood has been primed. The drawback of this is that there will be some texture, though it will definitely cover any wood grain or imperfections in the walls. The second involves a lot of sanding, but it does work well. You have to have relatively smooth walls to begin with. Paint once, sand until it is smooth, smooth, smooth. Water down the paint slightly, paint again. Sand until smooth...repeat as needed. I do this mainly for ceilings. But, I think your idea of using spackle would work well with a combination of this second process. Spackle thin layer, sand until smooth, paint, sand until smooth. Then use the thinned paint to apply a second coat. Sand again/paint again as needed. :)

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Sheetrock is smooth when painted, at least both the painted, unpainted and primed, and unpainted walls in this house were before we got them painted. The "in" finish on interior walls nowadays is a fine texture, NOT smooth, that is achieved by sanding the paint. If you want to simulate the look in mini I'd suggest taking a strip of 80-120 grit sandpaper and lightly tapping it over the surface of your damp, formerly perfectly smooth spackle (about 1/16" layer chould do the trick). Since I finish off my houses to MY tastes, I have smooth walls.

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Oh,I am so happy! :yes: Between the 2 of you,Brae,and Holly, I think I've got it! First,Brae,it hadn't occurred to me to use painted paper on walls! :doh: Very cool idea that I will remember for later!

But,I know now the sanding,and spackling and sanding will be my base,Brae.Then,Holly,I will use sandpaper to texture a last thick coat of spackle. I'll let it dry hard,then I'll paint that...and that should get me what I want-or at least more realistic...Yes!

I just couldn't figure out how to do the 'not smooth/not too rough' wall texture I grew up with in most of my homes...(We moved ALOT). I have used a sheet of painted sandpaper to emulate a 'popcorn' ceiling in a small roombox and thought it could simulate the wall texture I'm thinking of,but I have to use what I have on hand right now and my sheets are way too small to paper a dh wall,so that idea was out....Anyway,spackle to the rescue,again!! Yay! Thanx,ladies! :cheezy:

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