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Corrugated Siding=Corrugated Cardboard?


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One time I found corrugated sheets of scrapbook paper in A C Moore. I bought all they had. It was kind of thin but the size of the "corrugations" were very small and worked out nicely for a half s

Well,I've changed my mind again! First,apologies to anyone who offered help when I was considering a board and batten exterior. But,researching that finish actually led me to decide for sure that I'm

Good one Kat , kind of like " wish in one hand and crap in the other "

Great links Helen! Who knew you could do so many things with corrugated materials.

I like Holly's tin roof. There is something very nostalgic about tin roofs. Maybe there will be a tin roof in one of my future builds :)

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They are pretty neat aye? I'm thinking one day for one of my houses landscaping corrugated creatures will feature.... NZ went through a phase of cutting shapes (a lot of Maori designs or animals/fish) out of mini Corrugated Iron and painting them and hanging them on fences in pool and bbq areas etc so I might incorporate this too. Debora I agree that there is something nostalgic about tin roofs :)

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I have always loved tin roofs and tin sided buildings,but took them for granted,as I see so much of it used here in Southeastern Alabama,U.S.-very old and very new examples. Until I started Googling about it to prepare for this build,I never realized how long corrugated tin has been around (1850s or 70s?) or that it has been so common in other countries for that long,too! There's a small wooden porch attached to the trailer I rent and it has a tin roof-Heavenly when it rains!!So glad you are having fun with this,too,Helen,and yes,Debora-do it! :yes:

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One time I found corrugated sheets of scrapbook paper in A C Moore. I bought all they had. It was kind of thin but the size of the "corrugations" were very small and worked out nicely for a half scale house that I built. I did several layers of acrylic spray on the sheets before I tried to use them. I had to glue the pieces to pieces of cardboard to give them strength. A lot of buildings and houses have corrugated roofs out here also. They stand up to the extreme temperatures and weather we have.

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Hi,Roxie! When you say acrylic spray,do you mean a clear coat of something...Not to be ignorant,but I don't know since I can hardly use spray anything-except some paints-because of my stupid reactions to certain chemicals. But someone else may be able to use it. I bet the corrugated paper you and Morgan mentioned is nice-I've never noticed it,as I haven't bought paper at Michael's and we don't have an A.C. Moore's here. Luckily,the boxes I am sourcing from are new,clean,and free! :D

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One thing I forgot to mention with the corrugated stuff......it "dents" easily. I got it all on the house and got a lot of little dents in the roofing. You have to be really careful how you handle it. Just saying.......

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Yeah,Roxie,that worries me a little bit,but in my case this little house won't be handled much once it's done. The Cinderella Moments lady evidently sells her dollhouses with the C.C. siding for hundreds of $, (which I am NOT,NOT,NOT comparing myself to,y'all!),but they must hold up enough for someone to charge that and to pay it-? :huh:

I'm planning to do all the treatment to the C.C. before attaching it to the house exterior and I really think by the time I get the paint and a coat of Mod Podge on it,it will be pretty hard! If,not,I'll try something else. I'm nowhere near Daphne,Holly,but maybe someone else on the forum is? I hope to get a lot done on this over the weekend! ^_^

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I probably should start another topic,about windows,but since my question is about my current build I'll post it here. I was wondering how doable it would be to make front windows for the D.C. Ashley that are similar to the Buttercup's or The Orchid's? I mean their front first floor windows,which have a double hung look.

The Ashley normally just has open rectangles surrounded with trim that comes with the kit. I'm Not buying windows,and I'm not replicating the arched trim of the GL houses' windows-just the inner 2 frames.They won't be working windows,but I'd like to make them more realistic than the kit's original design. Rigid packaging plastic will be the 'glass'. The walls will be built up a bit by the corrugated cardboard exterior and flat,spackled interior.

I've seen how the Orchid windows go together,but not the Buttercup's windows. They both have the look I want,especially the Buttercup,which is very similar in size to the Ashley.

Keep in mind I don't use power tools,but can use scrap wood or trim and a craft knife or even thick card.

I think I can figure some of this out,but would appreciate any advice or instructions to go by. I'm posting a web photo of a bare wood Ashley-NOT mine-that I came across,so you can see what I am referring to. Thanx in advance! ^_^

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/428686458251722650/

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The corrugated scrapbook paper at Michael's is 1.99 a sheet, regular price. They have 40% off sales and 40% off coupons. I use the craftsmart sealer which I buy at 3/$1.00 on sale. Two coats. Craftsmart dark grey as basecoat, also at 3/$1. Then, I use metallic silver of some sort and last, burnt umber for rust. I peel away the backing and paint the underside of edges. It is sturdy enough and needs no further backing. However, I get the white, which seems sturdier.

For several years, corrugated tin has been used in every way in high end homes. Go figure.

P.S. Do the math. The scrapbook paper is too large, technically, for 1" scale and the cardboard box kind even more so. This is a PERFECT example of what I preach. Scale is not always an exact science. Sometimes, it is about what LOOKS right. This scrapbook paper is great looking in 1" & 1/2" scale and not bad in 1/4" even.

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I'm using cardboard I have at home,coated with diluted spackle as stiffener and it has really turned out well for the effect I want. I may use some to accent the interior walls.

But now I really need help with this window idea I mentioned. Maybe I shoulda posted it elsewhere....?

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The windows aren't that hard to make. Trace the window opening onto a piece of paper for a pattern. Lay your stripwood pieces for the outer frame around the outside of your pencil line, either mitering the corners or butting them, and make two of these, gluing them together.. Take a piece of your stripwood and lay it across the center of your pattern and trace both sides. With one outer frame lying on your pattern, cut stripwood to fit across the inside of the upper frame and the center piece. Decide (again) if you want to miter or butt this frame as well; then cut your side pieces to fit and glue them all together and repeat this process for the second outer frame. Paint or otherwise finish off your frames and use your pattern to cut your plastic to fit the inner frames. When you're ready to glue the window in place, glue one to the inside with the inner framed part on the bottom, and glue the other one to the outside with the inner framed part at the top. You can cut a piece of kit scrapwood to fit between the middle of the inner frames if the gap bothers you.

If you use card you can simply trace your pattern onto the card and then measure for your outer and inner frames and cut around them. Use a stylus or other dull, pointed item to indent between the outer and inner frame, prime and paint as you did for your corrugated siding, glue on the plastic and proceed as for the stripwood version.

BTW, I don't recall many of the Buttercup's windows having interior outer frames for the windows, and I made mine using heavy card/ posterboard. It's windows had the upper & lower sashes cut out so the inner frames' middles glued to it to eliminate the gap.

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Morgan,yes-you may have missed what I said just before your earlier post last night,but I want to do a double hung look. Thanx for your help,always!

Holly,I'll have to read this again when I get home but I think this is exactly what I want to do! I really appreciate the instructions!

Judith,I'll have to measure the windows later,but it's moot,because I want to make them myself,probably out of card,most likely with Holly's instructions. Thanx so much,though!

I'm trying to make as much as possible myself on this build,partly the $ issue,but also the practice to hone some skills to maybe do a more elaborate build one day (I can dream can't I? lol). The biggest problem with me is procrastination and I'm just so slow with my hands when I am working on anything-but,I am still enjoying it and that matters most! ^_^ Thanx for the help!!!

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In regards to the window effect I want,look what I found in Mike's gallery(while searching windows). Very cool! Between these diagrams and Holly's instructions,I ought to be able to make 'double hung' windows. Thanx for having this in your gallery,Mike/mesp2k!

http://www.greenleafdollhouses.com/forum/index.php?app=gallery&image=81701

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