Jump to content

Mini Lathe


Chris P.
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am getting a used one from a family member sometime this summer, but I don't know the brand yet or how to use it.

I'll repost here if I can find out the brand name. It's not a newer one but I know they have loved it.

Hope someone else has one already and can answer you faster than I can.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought a Micromark lathe, umm, 'bout 5 years ago? It was around $100, not $500 or $850...yikes! There's a couple on ebay that look identical to mine > click

You'll need small turning chisels also.

My lathe is a 12 x 8, that's the maximum size of the wood that will fit on it > 12" long x 8" diameter. Its cast iron.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Happy Heart

Do any of you have a mini lathe? Do you have one you would recommend?

Thanks!

I have two. One is part of a multi-configuration tool I bought myself from Micromark, it's not that powerful. My other mini lathe, which loses power on anything over 1 1/2" in diameter is a Jarmac and it is quite sufficient for most of my mini turning needs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There was an article in an old Miniature Collector I read about building a mini lathe with a dremel. I'll look to see if I can find the info soon.

That would be fabulous! A dremel, I have.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dremel used to make a lathe as well, called the Dremel Moto 700. It's no longer produced and the main complaint was that it was only powerful enough to make small things like dollhouse furniture ;) You can occasionally find them on ebay, I found mine on craigslist for 30 bucks this winter. I wish I had more info for you about how well it works, but I only gave it enough of a test run to be sure it functioned, which it does. I still need to get the tools to judge it properly.

The big potential issue I see, is that replacement parts are going to be either extremely difficult to find or very expensive (or both).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm so sorry to keep you waiting because I have to go to my mini guild meeting in an hour, so I have to run. I promise to look for the article tonight!

If you have MC at home, this is the info from their index: MORGENSTERN, ROBERT, "Make a Tabletop Miniature Lathe," p. 40-42, Nov
03

Now the challenge is FINDING that exact magazine in my stack! ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't have a mini lathe, however have begun doing turnings with a drill and jewel's screwdrivers... Just a thought as a drill is one of those tools most would already have in their stockpile of real life sized tools. :)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you put your blank in the chuck? How are you holding the drill steady?

You can put your drill into a drill press to hold it steady. Drill presses don't have to stand vertical, you can lay them on their sides.Then you have both hands free for the carving. Wood goes in the drill in place of the drill bit. Carving tools in your hands. I saw this on a DIY thing once. It's probably on a Utube clip somewhere.

Just another thought - you could clamp the drill in a vice grip or use C clamps to hold it onto a workbench.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found the article. It is COMPLICATED. :baby: But I also have heard tips on how to use a drill bit or a simple Dremel to make a simple lathe, just like Selkie is describing! I think her version would be much easier for anyone who wants to try it. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry guys, didn't look at this again last night as I had a couple of surprise orders as well as digging out something black that would still be cool to be worn here soon. Anyways, what Skelkie describes is exactly what I was thinking. I saw the description of this in several older mini workbooks if you will on how to make your own mini furniture -- given you'll not be able to do anything like turned bowls or whatnot. If however you're just looking to do some turnings on dowels after some practice it's really not so difficult as one would initially think! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two problems with just using a drill press to hold the turning is there is no support for the tailpiece, the end fatherest away from the drill chuck and you have no tool rest for any type of turning tools, chisels, parting, etc. A clamped plain wood block with a hole just slightly larger than what you are turning couId be used to support the tailpiece. If you do use this method go slow, start at the tailpiece and only use a rasp or sanding block or you may find things flying around where you don't want them, like your body. Be sure to wear at least eye protection but a full face shield would be better. Be safe!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very good points, Doc. I know my limits, and I'm pretty sure building my own lathe is NOT something I could do. I'm content for now to buy turnings from others. Maybe one day when I build up my skill set, but for now I'm still Far Too Green. :salute:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can put your drill into a drill press to hold it steady. Drill presses don't have to stand vertical, you can lay them on their sides.Then you have both hands free for the carving. Wood goes in the drill in place of the drill bit. Carving tools in your hands. I saw this on a DIY thing once. It's probably on a Utube clip somewhere.

Just another thought - you could clamp the drill in a vice grip or use C clamps to hold it onto a workbench.

My drill press is bolted to a worktable, but I can see a drill in a vise. Thank you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I turned table legs for the pub's kitchen table in DH's full-size lathe, which is an el cheapo. I have a gorgeous mini lathe from Harbor Freight that is buried, along with DH's, out in the garage; I haven't used it yet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a gorgeous mini lathe from Harbor Freight that is buried, along with DH's, out in the garage; I haven't used it yet.

I say, woman, you need to get that man of yours motivated to get your mini workshop up and running.

I can't imagine having all that cool stuff and not be able to use it.

I know my work areas just being a mess are a struggle enough - can't imagine not having a place to work at all.

At least I can shove the mess around.

You tell him that we (your mini friends) need you to be building and creating. Maybe that will push him to fix it up for you.

Please :worthy: Mr. Havanaholly, set up our dear friend's workshop space post haste.

:please:

Think that plea will work?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I say, woman, you need to get that man of yours motivated to get your mini workshop up and running.

I can't imagine having all that cool stuff and not be able to use it.

I know my work areas just being a mess are a struggle enough - can't imagine not having a place to work at all.

At least I can shove the mess around.

You tell him that we (your mini friends) need you to be building and creating. Maybe that will push him to fix it up for you.

Please :worthy: Mr. Havanaholly, set up our dear friend's workshop space post haste.

:please:

Think that plea will work?

The problem is finding someone to BUILD the darn thing! Apparently the economy is recovereing, all the builders we've tried to entice are "too busy"!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...