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Make your own paper clay


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I have searched for a recipie as well... Dont have the money to buy the stuff, and cannot seem to find it in the stores around here... Let me know if you find anything that works well.!!

kellee

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There are two kinds of paperclay, which can be confusing. The link is for the paperclay that is a mix of paper and clay and needs to be fired in a kiln. The brand name Paperclay is something else.

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So is the air dying paperclay similiar to paper mache ?

I have seen alot of the beautiful work on here with paperclay and would love to use it but just cannot afford it. Having a recipie to make it at home would be wonderful... you could make just enough.!!

Kellee

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I checked out the links. The paper mache clay described in the video is a paper mache. I've used Paperclay, and a paper mache made from pulp as described in the video, although I bought mine in a bag, didn't make it. I used it to make the tree trunk house for Miss Nutkin.

http://grazhina-nuthouse.blogspot.com/

Looking at the video, it looks like the same texture I got from the bag of dry paper mache mix. It can be smoothed, and would work just fine for stonework. I also made a Paperclay chair for Miss Nutkin. The brand name Paperclay can be made perfectly smooth, the other stuff can't, so it all depends on what you want to do with it. If I wanted to make a stone wall I'd use the paper mache, it's far cheaper. I bought it at Michael's or AC Moore.

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You can go to a home improvement store and buy a large bucket of paper mache mix for just a few dollars. I've used alot of it, and it works up very nicely. You can make it rough looking, smooth, use templates to apply patterns to it, shape stones with it, or just about anything you would like to do with it. Adjusting the amount of water is the key to the end result. You should be able to find a smaller container in those stores, and experiment with it, for very little cost. Paperclay is nice, but I agree, it is quite expensive if you need much at all.

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Well, y'all are braver than I am! I haven't used any of those products yet. I have a bunch of Fimo and a book with all kinds of ideas for using it, but haven't done anything with that either! :p

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You can go to a home improvement store and buy a large bucket of paper mache mix for just a few dollars. I've used alot of it, and it works up very nicely. You can make it rough looking, smooth, use templates to apply patterns to it, shape stones with it, or just about anything you would like to do with it. Adjusting the amount of water is the key to the end result. You should be able to find a smaller container in those stores, and experiment with it, for very little cost. Paperclay is nice, but I agree, it is quite expensive if you need much at all.

I have a lot of brick pattern sticky tape/template (don't know the real name!) left over. If I used the paper mache mix and dyed it with paint, do you think it would give the same effect as the brick mix that comes with kits? I really like the look for the base.

Kirsten

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I just read through this thread and I have to say I am more confused than ever. I don't get the difference between the paperclay and paper mache. I know how to make that mix......I taught kindergarten and preschool for 30 years. I have recipes for all kinds of doughs and clays. Is this what Tracy Topps uses for her wonderful stonework on her houses? I bought a kit years back and made a fireplace with stones but can't recall what it was I used. I was trying to make something out of kitchen materials without going out to the hardware to buy all kinds of supplies. Maybe it just can't be done that way. I will read further and see what I come up with. Maybe there is something that air dries that can be concocted ( is that a word?) from paper, water, flour, cornstarch something like that?

:p

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While I agree that the paperclay is expensive, I also swear by it. I am currently putting a "stone" facade on my florist shop (the Orchid), and I know it will withstand the test of time. I always wait until I have a 40% coupon for Hobby Lobby and buy it then. I have used both the DAS brand and the Creative Paperclay brand, which is the better of the two (the most expensive, as well). I figure that if it is worth taking the time to do the paperclay work, it is worth investing in a good quality material. In years past, I have made things with the homemade formulas, but I don't thing it has the longevity of the paperclay products. Plus, the purchased formulas are much easier to work with and don't crack as much either.

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Thanks Rhonda I realize your a correct on the quality control factor its just the $$ that I was trying to save. lol I wish I could remember what I used on the fireplace because I made it 25 years ago or so and its still there in one piece!

Thanks Linda! That's what I was talking about making something with regular ingredients that you would have around the house and not have to go out and buy a ton of stuff. lol

I use to make various mixes of playdough and clay that you cook that held up for a long time also.

I still have things my kids made for me for 30 years from those kitchen mixes. I don't know if they would stick to wood though.

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I used to make my own papier mache for crafts with my children, and then later on for creating props and embellishing set pieces for my theatre school productions. I used it over wood, styrofoam - it even stuck to balloons when I made the kids' birthday pinatas! It's durable and has withstood the test of time - but Paperclay is definitely my favourite now. It works more like a clay than papier mache - holds it's shape well, and has a beautifully smooth texture. (Because it's made with volcanic ash, not paper mulch.) It does cost money - and I don't have much spare cash, that's for sure - but I feel it's worth the price. Having said that ... there's nothing wrong with good old papier mache! If you're looking for a recipe, choose one that includes a mould retardant. Sorry I can't recall what I used to add - just a few drops of something. I'm sure you can Google search a good recipe. :p

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Thats a good suggestion about the mold stuff especially living in humid Virginia! I dunno what to to use but sealer over the top should keep out moisture.

I tried something this afternoon having nothing better to do. I took shredded paper from my paper shredder and mixed it up with white glue, water, cornstarch...voila a nice mushy substance that I coated a bottom part of a Michaels hutch with. Then I made little "stones" that I stuck into the mess.

Its drying but if it doesn't crack I plan to spray it with sealer and paint it for my fireplace. I will let you know what happens. :p

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For those who like the paper mache, have you ever used the fiber egg cartons? They can be torn up and boiled in a little water then put in the blender and they make a smother product then paper. I've been told there is already glue in them, but I prefer to add just a little wood glue. Also, once this mixture is dried it takes wood burning very nicely for those who want to add detail this way. Paints nice also.

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Interesting, Viola - thanks for sharing. :D I wouldn't have thought you could use a woodburning technique on papier mache, because of the high glue content. I must mentally file this away for future reference. (And hope I remember it when the need arises! :p)

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I use DAS air drying clay for my brick & stonework. It comes in a (I think) 2 pound package and it's pretty easy to work with - especially if you have a rolling pin to roll it out to the desired thickness. I get it at Michael's. With a 40% off coupon it only costs me approx. $3. I just finished bricking the sugarplum and making clay shingles for the roof and I used a bit less than one package of DAS to do the whole house, so it's fairly economical depending on how thick/thin you roll the clay out.

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So you roll it out and glue it on all at once? DUH! lol I have a nice 50% off coupon I can use!

I think this would be the way to go. My home made concoction is cracking. I might have used this to make my fireplace years back. Where so you get a stencil to make bricks? I think I asked about this before.

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So you roll it out and glue it on all at once? DUH! lol I have a nice 50% off coupon I can use!

Where so you get a stencil to make bricks? I think I asked about this before.

I roll out enough DAS clay to glue to one wall of the house at a time. I glue the clay onto the wall (I spread the glue on the wall & lay the clay on top of that) and it's usually in more than one piece (the clay I mean) because I'm not very good about rolling out just enough in just the right size to cover the wall with just one piece. But the clay pieces together on the wall easy enough - you just "mush" the two or more pieces of clay together where they meet and then smooth it down so the seams aren't noticeable. Then I use a stencil brush to pounce all over the top of the clay covered wall to give it texture and to make sure that it's pressed properly to the wall. Then I use my brick impress mold that I got from Malcom's Miniatures to make my bricks. I love this impress mold - it makes great bricks!!! I also have the roof tiles mold that I used for the clay shingles on the roof of my Sugarplum (updated pictures soon). If you can carve a fairly straight line you don't even need a stencil or impress mold, you can use a straight edge ruler and a carving tool to carve out the bricks. I personally can't draw a straight line to save myself, hence the mold :p

If you find you've rolled out too much clay for one wall's use (which I do almost every single time) you can wrap it up tight in plastic wrap and put in a ziploc bag and it will keep for some time - I've done this and gone back to use it a few weeks later and was still able to use it. The trick is in not letting the clay dry out before you are ready to use it.

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Lisa you have inspired me to try this! Maybe on my buttercup that I plan to build one of these days if I can ever get the store done. I was so tempted to shelve the store because it was not going well but I am not giving up! I saved your instructions you just gave me Thanks :p

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I use this recipe for my paper clay projects. It works great! Just a note though, you really need to keep tools and fingers moist. Keep a bowl of water next to you for this purpose. If you don't it will be a sticky mess. The water also helps with smoothing. :yes:

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