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Staining shingles


paige224
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I'm new here and building my first dollhouse! I stained my shingles using the method of drenching them in stain and drying but I used ebony and hate the darkness. There is no wood texture. So I am purchasing new shingles to start over. I have noticed that many use a mixture if Ceramcoat gloss varnish and coloring, which I think maybe just acrylic apint. Can someone give me details on this and how it's done. Are the dipped or painted on. Thanks for any advise you can give me.

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I like to start with the lightest shade of stain. You can go darker, you can't go lighter. Try taking a strip of masking tape or blue painters tape and lay the upper edge of your shingles on it then stick it to a piece of cardboard. Make many rows. Then you can stain the shingles faster and easier than dipping each one.

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Ebony is=to black. They are supposed to be dark. You did everything right, just chose the wrong shade. I paint my shingles after they are glued on the roof. There's no reason you can't still use these on some other project. You can paint over stain with no problem. It will take a few coats to cover the darkness however. You can choose a lighter color stain for your next set, but I suggest you test 1 lone shingle before you dye a whole bunch, so you're not disappointed again. Good Luck!

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Sorry your staining didn't come out as you wanted. I need to start my shingles (for the first time) and I'm nervous about the method and how it will turn out. I did a search on the forum for 'Stain Shingles' (just searched the titles of the threads) and came up with lots of useful posts. Too many to list now.

But seems like everyone does it a different way and you've just got to experiment until you find a method that you like.

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Yes they put them on a screen or rack and dunked them in a pan filled with the stain then let them dry on the rack. I can remember what the thread was called.

If you paint them after they are on the roof don't glue them with water soluble glue. The paint will loosen them.

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I do this. I am on a painted house spree right now but for a long time I mostly stained my exteriors, so like to have a good assortment of stained siding and shingles on hand.

I thin water based stain (or rite dye) in a big coffee can, (let the dye get cold before adding shingles)then I dump all the shingles in the can and give it a few shakes. I check the color a few time and when I am happy I pour the shingles out on a screen over a plastic dish washing bucket. I use hair coloring gloves to lay the shingles out flat on the screening and put them out in the sun to flash dry. A very hot day is best!

The first time I did this I got everything at the dollar store, nylon screen, the dish pan and a big bag of disposable gloves even the stain. It was red maple. I dyed almost four pounds of shingles.

I save the remaining stain or dye in the same coffee can, depending on what the pigment is from. it keeps quite a while and rust from the coffee cans only improves it. If the shingles curl and that is a problem for you intended look, as soon as they dry pile heavy things on them for a few days. I just pound the tops flat before gluing to the roof and leave the bottom ends (the part that shows) curled at the corners.

BTW, hair dyes can make some lovely shingles too, so if you color your hair and always have extra left over, maybe give this a try instead of putting it down the drain. In a disposable container mix the left over with enough water to cover your shingles, stir a bit and keep checking until you are satisfied with the color, then give a light rinse, and dry. The dried shingle will be about two shades lighter.

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I use MinWax Golden Oak for my shingles and then I age them using india ink and alcohol...... Gives them just enough aging while keeping some of them in the stain........but that's only what I do. There are folks here with many better ideas!

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You could try brushing a wash of a lighter color (siena or ochre) over the ebony to bring out the grain.

Another method is to buy a two-pack of the heavy aluminum disposable roasting pans and use a large roofing nail to poke holes all over the bottom of one. Set the pan with holes into the pan without holes, put the shingles into the holey pan and pour in the dye/ stain, lift the inner pan straight up and let all the dye/ stain run into the lower pan and dump your shingles onto newspapers and spread then out to dry, repeat the process until all your shingles are stained.

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