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Fixing Mistakes


Connor's Mom
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It depends. Can you carefully slide an X-Acto or utility knive blade between them, even a little bit? If you can, you can gently but firmly wiggle it along to slide the seam. Don't worry if you slice out some slivers of wood. That can always be filled in.

You might try hitting the seam with a hair dryer to see if that will soften the glue at all, too.

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You can take a razor knife and carefully score the seam. If you did a good job gluing, it will probably have some damage. It's wood though, and wood can be repaired. You can use wood filler or spackle to fill any booboos.

You will do fine. Did you do the dry fit first to make sure the pieces fit together? Are you sure it isn't supposed to be that way to fit the next piece? It might help if you make a mark of some kind on the outside of pieces when you fit them so you remember which side faces out when you glue it. Like a magic marker 'X'. It will get covered up later with paint or siding.

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Thank you for all the advice everyone.

Corwin - I am just using regular carpenter's glue.

Maybe later today I will try the water/vinegar and knife method. I may take a break from it today and get to it tomorrow, we'll see.

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I think you're trying too hard (not specifically with THIS thread..but through all of them). This is supposed to be FUN. When it's no longer fun, either you need to step away for awhile and come back to it..or let it go entirely. Not everyone is "cut out" to be a builder. Some folks really don't like / can't manage building, but take great satisfaction in decorating...and that can be great fun, too.

You're trying to be "perfect". Here's the flaw in that thinking: No one is perfect. There's an old saying that I have had rattling in my head since the 1960's: "Nothing would be done at all if a man waited until he could do it so well that no one could find fault with it." The dollhouse is yours. No one else's. Unless you show it to someone who is a "master builder", they won't see "mistakes". They'll see a lovely house, and will admire your craftsmanship. This is your first house. If you continue to build (and again, not everyone likes building, and that's OK, too!) your next house will be better, and the one after that, better still. Or not. And that's OK!! They're for your enjoyment, and no one else's (unless you're trying to go into business!). So step away for awhile, and when you come back to it, it'll make sense, probably.

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And unless you specifically ask, most "master builders" will keep their negative crticisms to themselves. My own structures continue to have many mini flaws & booboos; the trick is to disguise themor bash them so that they look deliberate! If the first build (or any build) had to be absolutely perfect, wy bother at all? I like the attitude of the Native American weavers of the SW; they always put a deliberate flaw into their work; I read somewhere that they believe (don't know if it's true or not) that if they ever weave a perfect design it's their last work. I really like that thought! I don't worry about whether it looks "perfect", just pretty & sturdy.

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I like the attitude of the Native American weavers of the SW; they always put a deliberate flaw into their work; I read somewhere that they believe (don't know if it's true or not) that if they ever weave a perfect design it's their last work. I really like that thought! I don't worry about whether it looks "perfect", just pretty & sturdy.

Holly, I haven't heard that one, but it may be similar to the myth of Arachne. Her skill paid off in a very unexpected way!

From http://www.theoi.com/Heroine/Arakhne.html

ARACHNE (Arakhnê), a Lydian maiden, daughter of Idmon of Colophon, who was a famous dyer in purple. His daughter was greatly skilled in the art of weaving, and, proud of her talent, she even ventured to challenge Athena to compete with her. Arachne produced a piece of cloth in which the amours of the gods were woven, and as Athena could find no fault with it, she tore the work to pieces, and Arachne in despair hung herself. The goddess loosened the rope and saved her life, but the rope was changed into a cobweb and Arachne herself into a spider (arachnê), the animal most odious to Athena. This fable seems to suggest the idea that man learnt the art of weaving from the spider, and that it was invented in Lydia.

Source: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.

From http://howstuffworks.com/amish4.htm

A common myth has developed that all Amish quilts contain a deliberate flaw because to make something perfect would be to challenge God. Some individuals may do such things, but it is certainly not a requirement. It would be unusual to find a large handmade item without a single imperfection.

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Yes, I have learned my lesson ;) My perfectionism is a problem in more things than just my dh LOL Maybe this process will teach me to be gentle with myself! As I have gone on, little gaps or imperfections arent freaking me out (as much :o )

~M

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Mistakes is why there's trim for the house. ;)

Perfect is something that is almost imposssible to achieve...and often not worth the effort anyway. You're human, Michelle, mistakes will be made. And the people who care about you and like you will think that your work is beautiful anyway.

Terri

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