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  1. I'd go with the above suggestion of using some type of needled nose glue applicator to insert glue, and then use a hardcover heavy book to hold it down flat to dry.
  2. I may be able to help you out if you are unable to get a solid date. Check your PM's :)
  3. Foam pipe insulation cover - cut lengthwise. Example video where they made crude cuts - you could be more careful and then paint it, but it shows how it can be shaped easily with supports, which a real pool would have under bends anyway. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPG5iCp38bA
  4. Michael's craft store sent a pile of coupons for tonight and tomorrow, so while not technically minis, loads of supplies could be snapped up at good prices. I also received an email from quilled creations, as well as True 2 Scale, they are having a promo on their halloween kits - on their website top banner links it. HBS sent out a 20% off good till Dec 1st.
  5. Sheep smell funky before you treat the wool too ;) Animal fibers, even dog, clean up incredibly well, surprisingly! I would have never believed it either until I saw (and didn't smell) made pieces myself
  6. Knitting it would take an extremely large quantity of hair, since you'd need to be able to spin it into a skeins. A short scarf could take an average of 2-3 skeins, being about 300-500 yards. That said, I don't know what kind of dogs you have, obviously large breeds would have more hair, and certain breeds have a double layer coat which sheds much more than others. This 2nd layer undercoat is generally used for this, which has softer fibers and lends itself to spinning (less itchy wool too). I don't spin personally, so I can't give you a good estimate on how much wool weight = a yard, that depends on yarn thickness desired too. I imagine finding a spinner and knitter who would make a scarf of your pattern choice would be a pricey endeavor. Possibly thinner lace weight yarn (needed to reach scarf yardage lengths) means smaller needles and more thus skilled knitting If you have a local yarn shop, they may know of local spinners or have a bulletin board posting knitters willing to knit for a fee. Give 'em a call, I've always found my local yarn shop staff were more than friendly and willing to help. Keeping it local might help reduce costs too, no shipping and such. Another option to consider -You may find you can felt your own dog's hair and make a little memento yourself without having to pay a spinning service, collect multiple trash bags of fur, and pay for a knitting service. It's really not as hard as someone might think. Felting your own: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2pAUAMT5I8 making flat pieces of felt. Or what about having a miniature felt artist use your dog's hair to felt something like this: https://www.etsy.com/shop/JanetsNeedleFelting?ref=l2-shopheader-name I don't know this artist, just an example I found that would be readily available to contact, and prices seemed reasonable. I mention this in particular because it could mix your love of minis and your dogs. You could even place them in a scene. In any event, best of luck and I hope you find what you're looking for.
  7. Time to sneak that bag of marshmallows away from Roland ;)
  8. I'm sure once you open it up, you'll find it's very simple to piece together by just using the cover page photo for reference. I don't know what your intentions are for it in the end, but I think you'll find it is also easy to move some things around and change the look if you wish. Either way good luck, just dive in and if you get caught up hop back on the forum for help.
  9. Huge Congrats! It's always been one of my favorite builds, not one bit surprised it has received attention from the publishers.
  10. I use it, but haven't posted minis yet. I will say I have done a lot of poking around looking at minis there though . Some hashtags you may wish to search beyond dollhouseminiatures are: miniature, tinyfurniture, dollhouse, dollhouses, minis, and then kind of go down the rabbit hole on those and see what some others have used as tags. There is a lot of talent and much eye candy to be found there.
  11. Here they are on Cynthia Howe's site, so you can see the available colors. http://cynthiahoweminiatures.com/shop/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=95_114
  12. If your dollhouse is in a room humid enough to force the dried glues mixed into the snow base to become wet again, you've got big problems in your real house to deal with.
  13. Woodland scenics makes a powdered snow product. I've also seen a few of the railroad landscapers make a mixtures with baking soda and some other powders - everyone has a special mixture but it's 90% baking soda. Either way it's done by layering watered down glues and the powder until you get what you're looking for in terms of coverage. It's messy but the end results are pretty good. http://woodlandscenics.woodlandscenics.com/show/Item/SN140/page/1
  14. You could use the robe pattern from this AIM mag as a start and simply make it shorter and add a rectangular addition for the buttoned up front http://www.scribd.com/doc/79999264/AIM-Imag-Issue-39-Special-Project-supplement Page 33
  15. Very cool little kit. Looks like lots of images in the instructions too.
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