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grazhina

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grazhina last won the day on July 8

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About grazhina

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    Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Maine

Previous Fields

  • Dollhouse Building Experience
    Five or more
  • Country
    United States

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  1. If a half inch scale room is 5.5 inches wide with a 4 inch high ceiling, would a depth of 7 inches be too deep? I'm wondering if that's too deep for getting your hand in there to place furnishings in the room. I'm still not used to building in 1:24.
  2. Although I have photos of the interior as it stands today, I'm winging it. Allingham altered a few things in her version, and I'll be leaning towards hers rather than the way the place looks today. The house was apparently originally a large merchant's home, then later it was divided into a row of 3 cottages, and at some point was a parsonage. Here's a picture of how it looks today.
  3. I've always liked this cottage painting by Helen Allingham done well over 100 years ago. As a matter of fact, she must have really liked the cottage too, as she painted it 3 times. I knew what village it was in and wondered if it still stood. It does! It's now a restaurant and bar in Worthing, West Sussex, and I found pictures online, plus several photos taken in the early 1900s. I also found out it is believed to have been built around 1480. I've started drawing plans to build it in 1:24 scale, but my poor brain is distraught. I'm not used to 1:24, have to keep checking and rechecking sizes, and since I've always had a problem with remembering numbers, it's a lot worse now that I'm 69. I seem to have developed more holes in my sieve of a brain. Like I didn't have enough holes as it was.....My cutaway drawing is 1/4" longer than my floorplan. I think I need to take a break and do something else for a while this afternoon.
  4. Kathie, I kind of think they expect it, and are just pleasantly pleased when people send their paperwork in early.
  5. Years ago when DH and I were putting up crown molding in our house I figured out how to do it. I'd tell DH how to put the molding into the saw and he'd look at it, shake his head, turn it around and cut it wrong. He'd do this a couple of times and then say "now how did you say to put it in?". Darn thing is, now I can't remember how to do it.
  6. I have one and use it quite a bit for cutting thin wood that's less than a half inch wide (like floorboards), however, if I need to cut an accurate angle cut it doesn't always come out right. I don't know if it's just me, the cutter, or my specific cutter.
  7. My real front porch, for settin' on! I cut up an old acrylic blanket to make the batting. The square blue footstool is filled with styrene beads from a similar footstool I never really liked. Since too many beads flew out all over the carpet, I used packing peanuts to fill up the gap. Waste not!!
  8. Hope y'all had a pleasant 4th of July. I finally finished sewing cushions for the backs of my rockers, the ready made ones were too bulky and expensive. I used some vintage fabric from my stash. It's odd to think that fabric I bought new is now vintage. I bought a remnant of this American flag fabric around 30 years ago, but never could think of the perfect use for it till now. BTW, I made the footstool out of my son's old bedroom curtains.
  9. This afternoon I thought that sitting out on the deck in my zero gravity chair might be good for my aching knee and swollen feet. Unfortunately when I opened the chair for the first time this year, I neglected to check that the mechanism was locked into open mode. I sat down, went to stretch out in the chair and it started closing up with me inside. The back of the chair was next to the steps that led to the upper part of the deck, so I wound up laying there, folded up, my head and shoulders leaning against the steps and my knees up in the air. I knew if I called for help it would take DH forever to respond, so I had to extricate myself by myself. Fortunately, I have strong stomach muscles, even though I haven't done a situp in a decade or two, and was able to get up and out. Just as well, he'd have just laughed at me for a while before he tried to help me out.
  10. See, not scary at all, Bob's came out just dandy.
  11. I saved them, printed all the pages. Do you think I'd get yelled at if I uploaded copies somewhere?
  12. My mom's house had 10' high ceilings, I was used to it, so they didn't seem high to me at all. Actually, half of the houses in the neighborhood had ceilings that high because they were built between 1890 and 1910. Here's a picture of an "efficiency" kitchen from the period. The ceiling looks to be about 12' high. You can see how one of the windows is quite tall and fairly high up. You could try balancing the room by making the windows appear taller. The second picture is from 1911 and looks like it has 11 or 12' high ceilings. Although the walls seem to be tiled all the way, there's still a band of another color dividing the space. You could paint the wall in one color to the height of your cabinets or somewhat above, then paint the upper part in a lighter shade of the same color, for example.
  13. I sold or gave away several of my dollhouses, mainly because I didn't have the room to keep them, and if we ever did move to a smaller house somewhere south of Maine, I'd certainly have to sell most of them. Selling the first one was very hard, it took me a couple of months to finally talk myself into it, but it was big and I really needed that table for work space. The second wasn't much easier, but I managed. I kept pretty much all the furnishings for other projects.
  14. Basswood is the most often used.
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