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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/10/2021 in all areas

  1. I made the exterior first floor of my Orchid general store "stone": I primed the exterior with flat white interior latex paint and when it was dry I spread spackle (you can use joint compound) 1/8" or so thick with an expired credit card and drew my "stones" in the wet spackle with a pointed toothpick and when the spackle was all completely dry I painted the "stones".
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  2. I have to do a foundation for the house I'm working on and I'm looking for alternatives to egg cartons, just because I'm tired of them and want to try something different. Haven't found a good alternative, so I'll probably do the egg cartons again. But I spent some time looking at life sized stone/pebble tiles. Would something like this work for the exterior of your house? https://www.homedepot.com/p/Merola-Tile-Pebblini-Mini-Sandstone-12-in-x-12-in-Pebble-Stone-Mosaic-Tile-10-63-sq-ft-Case-PGYPMSD/301418723
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  3. Love your Fairfield! And you had a similar idea for the attic as to ours, although I have to say my horror film fan daughter has added a bit of a dark twist to ours - we have a ping pong table too, but also books like Carrie, a caldron, creepy grandma in a rocking chair, skeletons, etc. She's having a lot of fun coming up with creepy stuff for it!
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  4. I used joint compound/wallboard mud to do the foundation of my first Orchid. I spread a thin layer of the compound and then used a toothpick to draw individual stones. When it dried, I sanded off the little peaks that had popped up in places and did a little shaping with an emery board, then painted the stones. Onnce it dries, the mud does not add a lot of weight to the project. Orchid Foundation
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  5. You can order thin wood shingles directly from Greenleaf: Contact: GREENLEAF DOLLHOUSES 436 LAKE ROAD SCHENEVUS, NY 12155 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Phone: (800) 253-7150 Fax: (607) 638-9076 email: customerservice@greenleafdollhouses.com or you can simulate a metal roof or, as Muriel suggests, use a different material for your shingles. I simulate asphalt shingles with coarse sandpaper:
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  6. I doubt you'll find the replacement pieces, but definitely doable yourself. Also unlikely to find shingled wood. I'd make a 6 triangle template out of card to see how it'll fit on your house, making sure you have the right size, then cut the pieces out of thin wood, and then shingle the completed roof. Most hobby shops have a section with thin wood. Our builders supplies shop does too. You can usually cut the wood by patiently scoring it with a sharp craft/utility/Stanley knife - a metal ruler helps keep the cuts straight. If you don't get on with wood, thicker card like mounting board or foam core will do the job too, just potentially a bit more delicate. Shingles are available to purchase, you'll either need to find ones that match the shape you have on the rest of the house, or make a feature using a new shape just for the tower roof. If you do it yourself and need help or tips for specific bits, ask again
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  7. That's a great color palette, very Victorian romance! I would go heavy on the warm tones in public rooms (warm colors are welcoming, energetic, and promote interaction). Restful, calming cool tones go well in bedrooms and private parts of the house.
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  8. IRL, floor planks traditionally run across the joists, which usually run the short way across a room. That means the flooring runs parallel to the long sides of a room. If your rooms are square, do what you want, but I would run all the floors in the same direction. Psychologically, floors running across your path make you slow down (at least in your mind), while floors that run parallel can feel like a freeway. So I would run the floors parallel to the open side of the house. Then I also wouldn't have to hide the raw ends of every plank.
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  9. It looks like a Dura Craft Victorian Mansion 800. Here's a link to the instructions if that will help https://www.dollhouseworkshop.net/instructions/duracraft/VM800.pdf
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  10. It can be so challenging to get those individual spindles to look nice. I've avoided them on my last few porch railings but I'll be doing one with individual spindles soon (also half scale), so I feel your pain! For spacing, my suggestion is to put spindles at the ends the distance you want the to be from the post (maybe about 1/8" or 3/16"), and then put a spindle in the middle between these two. This will divide the space into two equal segments. Next put a spindle in the middle of each of the two segments. Continue doing this until your spindles look close enough to each other. I find this easier than doing the math to figure out how far apart they should be spaced. Here's a post that shows what I mean (this part is near the bottom of the post): https://www.emilymorganti.com/blog/?p=12837
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  11. Thanks! maybe the color pallet attached will work out. I will probably be asking a lot of opinions along the way. I have picked up and made a lot of contents for the house. Just waiting to order the house until some of the kits I purchased are all together.
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  12. But it's doable. You can measure the angles in your photograph, measure the length of one of the tower top edges to get a base to fiddle with. and then add equally to each side of the six triangles to get the finished dimensions. Scrap car works well for this and can be used for patterns for cutting your final pieces from wood.
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  13. Just make the colors flow from one room to another. A major color in one room could be an accent color in the next room. In a dollhouse, where you see all the rooms at once, just select a palette of colors to choose from. For instance, if the dining room was burgundy, you could go with a pale version of that burgundy in the child's room above, resulting in some shade of pink or rose. Think of the colors as being a bouquet of assorted flowers. As for Victorian decor, I happen to have written Victorian Interiors and More, aka Victorian Decorating. Just click on the link in my sig.
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  14. I checked out the stock at our local WM; there was one big bottle left (I didn't really need it, but grabbed it anyway), and several of two smaller sizes. There was also spray tacky glue. I should have gotten that!
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  15. Here is a even bigger reason to take up the drink! https://www.wayfair.com/furniture/pdp/theodore-alexander-holland-bar-cabinet-fplj3892.html
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  16. From the album: Orchid (build) by KathieB

    There is another photo of this corner in progress; this one is painted. I spread the wallboard mud/joint compound (two names for same thing) on thinly, then dragged a toothpick through it to form the stones. Some of the raised edges formed when making the trough were sanded off with an emery board when the mud dried and then watercolor washes were applied. The stucco texture was formed by lightly tapping a damp sponge on the surface while the mud was quite wet. It reminds me of the stucco finish on the house I grew up in. The whole outside was sealed with satin finish polyacrylic.
    1 point
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