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Thought I share some stuff...

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And on we go.... Step 4.5 - cheating my way to a bulb....

Another option - and more or less the one I chose for the light base is using an existing light fixture. One like this for example: My thoughts behind it are rather economical in nature. Last year I bought 4 hanging globe lights for $6.50 plus $2.50 in shipping. That's $9.00 for four lights - nothing I make can beat that. So, with the help of my trusted hair-dryer I took them apart..... I now have: - four white glass globes to be used for som

Soapz

Soapz

 

Let's talk about..... bases for light bulbs - Step 4 - make it shine.....

So, I have raided my friends car shop for parts and I have found useful stuff. How to make the bulb base: there are several options that I played with: 1. Using crimp connectors and cut them in half. I used the blue one with a finish washer and threaded the LED through it. Painted it with faux brass - looks okay. 2. I used a wired bulb with base from HobbyLobby and half a green connector (without the metal squeezy

Soapz

Soapz

 

Result of steps 1 to 3........

I used glue to attach the soldered banding in place. I also added a picture of a previous attempt with a different brass banding, although I wasn't too happy with the results. But, as I know no shame at all - I will share those sad, sad results with you all. This one here has also a soldered banding with a circle thingy I got from JarJaf to attach chains. All of it is glued in place and has held up very well so far. Lo

Soapz

Soapz

 

Step 3 - Easy decision making - time for a coffee break while you think...

Decide which way you want to attach the banding to the top of the dome. As you can see there is definite discoloration, I will repaint that part and age the brass anyways to give the chandelier a more authentic look. Here is a close up of the soldered connection... not too bad for a beginner I think... Coffee break - which way to go.... I decided to go with this version - it looks better in my opinion...

Soapz

Soapz

 

Step 2.... and it continues

When the banding is shaped, use the third hand tool to hold the banding together at the cut edges and apply flux very thinly. I used a needle tip on my soldering iron and heated the banding from the inside of the circle while applying the solder on top of the banding. Solder runs toward heat, so all I did was swipe the solder along the joint and it applied really thin. Important: You really need to use flux - all other attempts at soldering brass together didn't hold. I

Soapz

Soapz

 

First Blog Entry - The never-ending lighting story.... part 1

A probably endless material list.... Making of glass dome chandelier: testing what can be done.... Materials used: Glass dome (available on etsy) - different styles, 'lids' are also available. Brass banding (JarJaf) Brass tubing Crimp connectors Finish washer LED wired, Bulbs wired Bits and pieces Tools used: Soldering Iron Flux Solder (thinnest you can find) Third Hand tool (I

Soapz

Soapz

 

What it is we want to accomplish...

So, here is Step 1: Cut the brass banding to exact size so that the edges meet and not overlap Bend the banding to a circle - use any tool available like a mandrel or a round wood dowel - I used my fingers. There should be no kinks when you solder. We are aiming for a thin solder connection, so bending after it is soldered might break it. This is the banding I used. It was a bit hard to bend, has a tendency to kink - but I made it work.

Soapz

Soapz

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